Free IELTS course

Are you one of the 2.2 million IELTS candidates who’ve taken the test in the last year?

IELTS candidate statistics show around US$440 million spent on IELTS tests per year

The latest IELTS statistics show that over 2.2 million IELTS tests are taken every year – a dramatic increase from the 43 000 IELTS tests taken twenty years ago in 1995.

If we take the average cost of the test as US$200, IELTS candidates spend around US$440 million on taking the test each year! (IELTS test fees vary from country to country – you can find out how much an IELTS test costs in your country here).

Are you one of the 2.2 million IELTS candidates who've taken the test in the last year? The latest IELTS statistics show that over 2.2 million IELTS tests are taken every year - a dramatic increase from the 43 000 IELTS tests taken twenty years ago in 1995. If we take the average cost of the test as US$200, IELTS candidates spend around US$440 million on taking the test each year! Although the infographic shows that the most common Academic band scores achieved by Arabic and Chinese speakers are 5.0 and 5.5 respectively, that's not the whole story: 15% of Arabic candidates and 29% of Chinese candidates achieve a band score 6.5 or higher! If you took one (or more) of the 2.2 million IELTS tests taken in the last year, why did you take the test? Did you take IELTS Academic or IELTS General Training? How did your scores compare to the averages in the infographic above? http://www.freeieltscourse.com/ielts-books-and-resources/ielts-candidate-statistics/

With one in four IELTS candidates (24%) taking the IELTS General Training test, it shows that IELTS isn’t only taken by people who want to enter university; it’s taken by people who want to demonstrate their English level in order to get a better job or to immigrate to an English-Speaking country, e.g. New Zealand, Australia or Canada.

Although the infographic above shows that the most common Academic band scores achieved by Arabic and Chinese speakers are 5.0 and 5.5 respectively, that’s not the whole story. A significant number of Arabic and Chinese candidates get higher band scores:

15% of Arabic candidates and 29% of Chinese candidates achieve a band score 6.5 or higher!

You can read about the most frequent band scores achieved by speakers of your language here.

The IELTS Writing test has proved to be the most difficult part of the Academic test, with the average band scores for both males and females being significantly lower than the average for listening, reading and speaking.

If you took one (or more) of the 2.2 million IELTS tests taken in the last year, why did you take the test? Did you take IELTS Academic or IELTS General Training? How did your scores compare to the averages in the infographic above? Let me know by leaving a comment below.

Pete

For more IELTS tips and advice, subscribe via email or RSS or try my free IELTS course.

3 comments on “Are you one of the 2.2 million IELTS candidates who’ve taken the test in the last year?

  1. Dear Pete,
    Doing some research for a blog I am writing about English Language Centers & Training and looking at the number of people who take IELTS. On your info graph you show the average score for Arabic, Chinese, Hindi and Spanish speakers and 2.2 million total people took the test. Here is the question, do you know by either the nationality or language how many people take the IELTS test. Example of the 2.2 million, 500,000 Arabic speakers take the test or 50,000 Saudi’s.

    I can’t seem to find this information in my searches. Thanks for whatever help you can provide. Dean Hoke (Abu Dhabi)

    1. Hi Dean.

      The latest statistics from IELTS (2015) show that over 2.7 million tests were taken last year. (The statistics in my infographic are based on the 2014 figures).

      You can see the latest statistics here: http://www.ielts.org/teaching-and-research/test-statistics

      As far as I’m aware, the numbers of IELTS candidates by nationality or first language isn’t publically available. I’d be interested in hearing if you find out any more through your research.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *